The Last Bookstore in downtown Los Angeles, California’s largest independent bookseller.

Everyone needs a vault like that. It makes everything inside seem at least 1.5X more desirable.

(Source: hands-in-the-air, via afewmorepages)

bookstorey:

Beverley Le Barrow


Of all the book designs ever created for the James Bond series, arguably, none have captured its glamour, sex, danger and camp tongue-in-cheek humour better than the 15 paperbacks produced for Triad Granada by the photographer Beverley Le Barrow (released between 1977 and 1979 and coinciding with the Roger Moore era of films). 

Looking forward to the reaction our own entry into the Bond canon gets when we reveal the cover very soon (maybe even TOMORROW)…William Boyd’s SOLO.

darienlibrary:

YOU ARE WHAT YOU READ
Miss Elisabeth of the Children’s Library is delving into what sounds like an Adult Fairy Tale. “This week I’m reading The Golem and the Jinni, by Helen Wecker. I really, really enjoyed it! It’s an adult book, but parts of it reminded me of the Junior One Book One Community book from last year, The Inquisitor’s Apprentice. Both take place in turn-of-the-century New York immigrant communities, and both involve ancient, cultural magic. Chava is a Golem, a Jewish creature of protection made of clay, designed to be the wife of a squirrely little man who dies shortly after awakening her while immigrating across the ocean to America. Jinni is a jinni from Syria, imprisoned in a copper jug and accidently taken to America by an unsuspecting family. This book had it all – history, magic, murderous fiends, and something that might be love. I highly recommend it.”
You Are What You Read is our “Staff Recommends” GONE WILD and features recommendations from Darien Library staff members. And you don’t have to live in Darien to receive an email with our top picks!

darienlibrary:

YOU ARE WHAT YOU READ

Miss Elisabeth of the Children’s Library is delving into what sounds like an Adult Fairy Tale. “This week I’m reading The Golem and the Jinni, by Helen Wecker. I really, really enjoyed it! It’s an adult book, but parts of it reminded me of the Junior One Book One Community book from last year, The Inquisitor’s Apprentice. Both take place in turn-of-the-century New York immigrant communities, and both involve ancient, cultural magic. Chava is a Golem, a Jewish creature of protection made of clay, designed to be the wife of a squirrely little man who dies shortly after awakening her while immigrating across the ocean to America. Jinni is a jinni from Syria, imprisoned in a copper jug and accidently taken to America by an unsuspecting family. This book had it all – history, magic, murderous fiends, and something that might be love. I highly recommend it.”

You Are What You Read is our “Staff Recommends” GONE WILD and features recommendations from Darien Library staff members. And you don’t have to live in Darien to receive an email with our top picks!

(via harperperennial)

awesomepeoplereading:

Snoop reads.

With my mind on Lolita and Lolita on my mind. 

awesomepeoplereading:

Snoop reads.

With my mind on Lolita and Lolita on my mind. 

bookriot:

Israeli bookstore chain launches ad campaign, “The right book will always keep you company.”
(via Bookstore Chain Helps You Sleep With Your Favorite Book Characters)

bookriot:

Israeli bookstore chain launches ad campaign, “The right book will always keep you company.”

(via Bookstore Chain Helps You Sleep With Your Favorite Book Characters)

(via oliveryeh)

The way your house looks just after you have finished cleaning up in anticipation of the arrival of your parents.
It feels so good that you take out your camera (the real one, not your mobile phone) to take a picture and you think, “This is how this place could always look, why don’t I care enough about myself to just be organized and clean on a daily basis?”
Then you ask yourself how you expect your seventy-year-old mother and father to get in and out of those low-slung chairs, but realize that they will probably not sit down in this room at all, because nobody ever does, despite its beauty. That’s why you’ve never bothered to put anything in that bowl. You tried pinecones once but that seemed forced. You imagine buying a bunch of old glass marbles but then you think “Seriously? Marbles?”
Your parents will likely sit in the room with the television or maybe the kitchen, or maybe they won’t even sit at all and all of you will go straight to dinner, rendering all the effort you put into making your place look impeccably beautiful impeccably moot. 

The way your house looks just after you have finished cleaning up in anticipation of the arrival of your parents.

It feels so good that you take out your camera (the real one, not your mobile phone) to take a picture and you think, “This is how this place could always look, why don’t I care enough about myself to just be organized and clean on a daily basis?”

Then you ask yourself how you expect your seventy-year-old mother and father to get in and out of those low-slung chairs, but realize that they will probably not sit down in this room at all, because nobody ever does, despite its beauty. That’s why you’ve never bothered to put anything in that bowl. You tried pinecones once but that seemed forced. You imagine buying a bunch of old glass marbles but then you think “Seriously? Marbles?”

Your parents will likely sit in the room with the television or maybe the kitchen, or maybe they won’t even sit at all and all of you will go straight to dinner, rendering all the effort you put into making your place look impeccably beautiful impeccably moot. 

(Source: marieclairemaison.com, via curmudgeonlaine)

The gorgeous, peaceful moment just before you have to strip the bed, gather up the stained part of your blanket into a ball that will fit into the bathroom sink, then wrestle with said blanket carefully enough that the water in the sink doesn’t splash all over the bathroom floor and the rest of the blanket remains relatively dry, after which you have to put on pants even though you aren’t quite ready to just so that you can take the blanket down to the basement laundry room.
The book itself will, inevitably, be fine despite your wish that all the coffee had just landed on the book because it was borrowed from a friend who isn’t likely to want it back and you still could have finished it once the pages dried out and might have even looked forward to that because it would have smelled like coffee.

The gorgeous, peaceful moment just before you have to strip the bed, gather up the stained part of your blanket into a ball that will fit into the bathroom sink, then wrestle with said blanket carefully enough that the water in the sink doesn’t splash all over the bathroom floor and the rest of the blanket remains relatively dry, after which you have to put on pants even though you aren’t quite ready to just so that you can take the blanket down to the basement laundry room.

The book itself will, inevitably, be fine despite your wish that all the coffee had just landed on the book because it was borrowed from a friend who isn’t likely to want it back and you still could have finished it once the pages dried out and might have even looked forward to that because it would have smelled like coffee.

(via booklover)

Does this inspire visceral physical anxiety in anyone else?

Does this inspire visceral physical anxiety in anyone else?

(via fuckyeahreading)

"I start a book and I want to make it perfect, want it to turn every color, want it to be the world. Ten pages in, I’ve already blown it, limited it, made it less, marred it. That’s very discouraging. I hate the book at that point. After a while I arrive at an accommodation: Well, it’s not the ideal, it’s not the perfect object I wanted to make, but maybe—if I go ahead and finish it anyway—I can get it right next time. Maybe I can have another chance."

— Joan Didion (via Austin Kleon)

(Source: theparisreview.org, via mttbll)

This book. I wish it were coming out sooner than late October, but having seen much of the interior I am pretty sure it’ll be worth the wait.

This book. I wish it were coming out sooner than late October, but having seen much of the interior I am pretty sure it’ll be worth the wait.